yachiyo ENOMOTO
November 15, 2020
Yurika Toyama
November 15, 2020

Takuya Kobayashi

(Yamagata, 1983)
Started photography at the age of 17 with his grandfather's single-lens reflex film camera. Studied film and direction at the Digital Film Department of Toho Gakuen Film School. After graduating from the school, he worked at a photography studio in Tokyo for two years. After that, he studied under Mitsugu Inada. Currently based in Tokyo, working as a photographer. As for his artwork, his main theme is the fusion and harmony between man- made objects and nature, and the relationship between them. After the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, he became more aware of the everyday in the midst of instability. Since then, I have also been creating works inspired by the boundary between the ordinary and the extraordinary. In my photographs, I seek a state of fusion between what I intended and what I did not intend, and the surprise and excitement I feel when I witness this. I want to express something different from what I usually see and understand with my own eyes through photography. His major solo exhibitions include "Tie the cherry blossom" Pictorico Shop & Gallery Omotesando (2020), and his major awards include Tokyo Front Line Photo Award 2012 selected and APA AWARD 2020 the photo work category selected.



"A photograph is a record of discovery."
(Takuya Kobayashi)

 
project description

Tie the cherry blossom

 

Since 2013, I have been photographing cherry blossoms at night across Japan with my own unique method. Illuminated cherry blossoms at night always enthuse me because they look different from the daytime. These photos are not multiple exposures. It is taken with a single shutter with long exposure. First of all, I imagine the cherry blossoms I want to express in front of the cherry blossoms illuminated by artificial light. Then, by using a method of connecting image to image with long exposures, I combine the calculation of the cherry blossom's placement through my own aesthetic sense with the chance of improvisation. The images created by the camera in this way go beyond my imagination and reveal a different image of the cherry blossoms, which further enthuses me. These photos have the beauty I wanted to express.

 
Untitled 2014 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2014 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2017 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2017 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2017 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2017 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2018 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2018 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2019 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2019 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2020 © Takuya Kobayashi
Untitled 2020 © Takuya Kobayashi
 
project presentation

This is the concept

"Hello. I'm Takuya Kobayashi, a photographer. First of all, I became interested in cherry blossoms because of the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011. I was in Tokyo at the time, and most of the events in Japan were under self-restraint, so the cherry blossom festivals that were held every year in various parts of Japan disappeared, and there were no cherry blossom lighting events, no bonbori (paper lanterns), and no stalls. Under such circumstances, the cherry blossoms at night looked completely different from what they used to look like because it was completely dark. I suddenly thought of using a clip-on strobe to take pictures of the cherry blossoms blooming in total darkness. I was shooting with a color film camera at the time, and when I saw the photos, the cherry blossom petals and intricate branches that appeared in the darkness looked like images of galaxies in space, nerve cells in the body, and blood vessels. Depending on the situation, the trunks and branches of the trees may look grotesque, but I was fascinated by the beauty of the cherry blossoms including that. Since then, I have been experimenting with different approaches to express the beauty of the images I felt at that time in my photographs, and in 2013, I tried the method of photographing cherry blossoms in this project, "Tie the cherry blossom" and felt that it was a good way to express the beauty of cherry blossoms that I was looking for. I have been photographing cherry blossoms using this method ever since. To explain the method, if I were to take a picture with a 10-second shutter speed, I would press the shutter toward that direction and take a 5-second exposure, then quickly turn to another location and take another 5-second exposure. By doing this, I think I can capture the whole atmosphere and time of the place, and the title "Tie the cherry blossom" is derived from this shooting movement. Thank you very much for your time."