Joyme Cuan
October 11, 2020
Claudia Corrales
October 11, 2020

Jordan Issell

(Havana, 1994)
Graduated in 2012 as a technician in Agronomy. In 2017 he began to work at the Factoría Habana Contemporary Art Center of the City Historian's Office. In this space he collaborates in the production and assembly of numerous exhibitions and workshops. In 2018 he participated in the workshop “Laboratory-Techniques of development and positivation of the Department of Photography” at the Faculty of Visual Arts of the University of the Arts in Havana (ISA), taught by photographer Reynaldo Cid. In 2020 he left Factoría Habana to develop as an independent photographer.



“The creative act lasts only an instant”.
(Henri Cartier-Bresson)

 
project description

Sui géneris

 

My vision as a photographer comes from my experiences, I try to capture problems that affect me as a social individual. I love the dynamics of the human condition and the situations it creates. Sui Géneris aims to explore the subject in interaction with its environment from images taken in dissimilar places, trying to harmonize between urban landscape and character. Conceived as a visual diary, this series does not tell a story in a linear way, it only makes small sketches of moments that captured my attention.

Untitle, 2020 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2019 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2018 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2019 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2018 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2019 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2018 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2019 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2020 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2018 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2019 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2018 © Jordan Issell
Untitle, 2019 © Jordan Issell
 
project presentation

This is the concept

"Most of these images touch on a common ground, and I think it's the human condition or humanism whatever you want to call it. I like to see how human beings interact, how they move, what they think, what they speak, what are the topics of conversation on the street. I always look for a queue for the bus or a store and I try, not to relate, but to be close and feel what they feel because I am also part of this society. I think photography is like therapy. I am a bit shy person and I use this to get closer to people and capture what they think, how they live. That is my maxim. So far it has worked for me. I'm never guided by the typical storyteller rule; I just go out into the street to hunt the photo –as who says–, for this reason I think that humanism is the basis of my work and I always like that the image when it is appreciated projects a dialogue, a questioning. It is not taking the photo to capture something beautiful and leave it captured. There always has to be a subtext in that image, and I think the street, the strangers, the situations, is what gives me the best this subtext. I am not thinking of an image and composing it. The dynamic is in the street and there I find the answer to everything I ask myself and that is where everything I question myself is."